Spotlight on Stoke

Home » 2013 » July

Monthly Archives: July 2013

Street Mural in Newport Street (2007)

A street mural painted on a hoarding in Newport Street, Middleport (2007)

Tunstall Park (2008)

Tunstall Park (2007202013__0015 (640x413)Tunstall Park (February, 2008)

Tunstall Park (2008)

Tunstall Park (February, 2008)

Glebedale Park (2013)

 

Alexander Scrivener (1852-1921)

Albert Square - Fenton

ALbert Square, Fenton

Hanley architect, Alexander Scrivener was born at Shelton on April 19th, 1852.

His father, Robert, and his elder brother, Edward, were architects. During 1868, Robert and Edward went into partnership and formed Robert Scrivener and Son whose offices were in Howard Place, Shelton. The firm designed the Mechanics Institution in Pall Mall and the Queen’s Hotel in Albion Street which later became Hanley Town Hall.

Alexander was educated at Hanley Art School. He became an architect and joined the firm. When their father died in 1878, Edward and Alexander acquired the practice.

Alexander married Anne Twyford. They had five children. The family lived in Endon where they worshipped at the parish church. Alexander’s two hobbies were music and archaeology. He conducted the Endon Choral Society and was choirmaster at the parish church.

A member of the North Staffordshire Field Club, he took part in archaeological digs and led field trips to historic buildings. The club made him its president for the year 1895-96. He undertook historical research and wrote articles for its journal.  In 1904, the Field Club awarded him the Garner Medal for services to archaeology and made him its president again a year later. During 1914, he excavated Castle Hill, at Audley proving conclusively that the de Audley family had built a castle there in the Middle Ages.

Politically, the Scriveners were Conservatives. They designed Hanley’s Conservative Club in Trinity Street which opened on February 25th, 1878.

Edward and Alexander were astute businessmen who used their professional skill and expertise to make Robert Scrivener and Son the area’s leading architects.

Sanitary ware manufacturer, Thomas Twyford employed the firm to design his Cliffe Vale factory. The practice built churches and schools throughout The Potteries and designed The Sentinel’s office in Foundry Street, Hanley. It designed numerous buildings in the town including the Roman Catholic Church in Jasper Street, the Higher Grade Elementary School, the Freemasons Hall in Cheapside and the telephone exchange in Marsh Street.

The buildings in Fenton which the firm designed included Queen Street Board Schools, the Cemetery Chapels and the Temperance Coffee Tavern in City Road. It built shops and offices in Christchurch Street, laid out Albert Square and designed the town hall.

Alexander designed St. Paul’s Church in Victoria Road, Newcastle-under-Lyme whose foundation Stone was laid by Sir Lovelace Stamer, the Bishop of Shrewsbury, on June 15th, 1905. Edward died while the church was being constructed and Alexander became the senior partner in the firm.

Consecrated by the Bishop of Lichfield in 1908, St. Paul’s was built of stone. A perpendicular style building, the church cost almost £700. The building, which could accommodate over 500 worshippers, had an octagonal spire. It had central heating and was lit by gas lights.

Alexander remained in practice until his death. Taken ill suddenly, he died aged 69 on December 17th, 1921 and was buried in Endon churchyard.

Copyright Betty Cooper – The Phoenix Trust 2013

Camera in the City – Fenton

Smith's Pool, FentonTaken in 2013, this photograph from the Phoenix Trust’s collection shows Smith’s Pool at the beginning of spring.

Fenton is a settlement of Anglo-Saxon origin. The name Fenton means a farmstead or village situated in low-lying marshland, which indicates that the first Fentonians could have lived in the area where Smith’s Pool is today.

Camera in the City – Richards Tiles

Richards Tiles Brownhills Works, Tunstall (March 1996)

Richards Tiles’ three factories in Tunstall were demolished many years ago. If you worked for Richards at the Top Works in Woodland Street, the Bottom Works in Scotia Road or at the Brownhills Works in Brownhills Road, Spotlight on Stoke would like to hear from you. Email daymar727@talktalk.net to share your memories with us. If you have any photographs of the works and your workmates or old copies of The Richards’ Record we should love to see them.

PH/CC

Camera in the City – Longton

Sutherland Institute

Athena

This photograph shows part of the tawny terracotta frieze above the main entrance to the Sutherland Institute in Lightwood Road, Longton.

Attributed to sculptor Charles Vyse, the frieze depicts Athena, the Greek goddess of culture, education, industry and commerce, with a child at her feet and two workmen presenting her with the fruits of their labour.

Photograph Copyright – The Phoenix Trust 2013

%d bloggers like this: