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Postcard from England #1, The Gladstone Pottery Museum | Tales Of Mindful Travels

Our much planned tour of our own country begins with a day spent in The Potteries at the Gladstone Pottery Museum, Longton, Stoke on Trent. Postcard today, review tomorrow.

Source: Postcard from England #1, The Gladstone Pottery Museum | Tales Of Mindful Travels

DiaryDate: Douglas Macmillan Coffee Morning in Tunstall Market

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Tunstall Market – an invitation to the party

tunstall marketCome and join the party. Tunstall’s heritage market is celebrating its 200th birthday tomorrow. Bring the family. Do your weekend shopping in Stoke-on-Trent’s best market while spending an enjoyable day taking part in the festivities.

In 1816, Tunstall’s chief constable, pottery manufacturer John Henry Clive, founded a company to build a Magistrates’ Courthouse and create a Market Place.

The company leased three-quarters of an acre of sloping ground called Stoney Croft from Walter Sneyd, the Lord of the Manor. It built a courthouse and laid out a market place, which later became Tower Square, on the site.

A two-storey stone building, the courthouse had a fire station with two fire engines and a market hall on the ground floor where eggs, butter, milk and cheese were sold when the market opened. The building faced eastwards. It was erected about halfway up the slope. Steps led from the lower part of the Market Place, where stalls were set up on market day, to the market hall’s main entrance.

Beneath the market hall was the town lock up – a dark, foul-smelling dungeon where prisoners were held while awaiting trial. The stocks stood at the foot of the steps leading to the market hall. Six hours in the stocks or a fine of five shillings was the usual penalty for being drunk and disorderly.

The company placed an advertisement in the Staffordshire Advertiser that was published on September 13, 1817, which read: “Notice is hereby given that henceforward a market will be held at Tunstall, in the Potteries, weekly on Saturdays in front of the Court-House. The first to be on Saturday, 20 September. Stalls and standings free.”

Tunstall Market was both a retail market and a wholesale market. Retailers sold fruit and vegetables, meat, fish, poultry and salt. Horse-drawn waggons brought dairy produce, fruit and vegetables to the wholesale market which attracted retailers from Burslem, Hanley, Stoke, Longton and Fenton.

DiaryDate: Join the Party – Tunstall Market celebrates its bicentenary on Saturday

tunstall marketTunstall’s heritage market is 200 years old.

In 1816, Tunstall’s chief constable, pottery manufacturer John Henry Clive, founded a company to build a Magistrates’ Courthouse and create a Market Place.

The company leased three-quarters of an acre of sloping ground called Stoney Croft from Walter Sneyd, the Lord of the Manor. It built a courthouse and laid out a market place, which later became Tower Square, on the site.

A two-storey stone building, the courthouse had a fire station with two fire engines and a market hall on the ground floor where eggs, butter, milk and cheese were sold when the market opened. The building faced eastwards. It was erected about half way up the slope. Steps led from the lower part of the Market Place, where stalls were set up on market day, to the market hall’s main entrance.

Beneath the market hall was the town lock up – a dark, foul smelling dungeon where prisoners were held while awaiting trial. The stocks stood at the foot of the steps leading to the market hall. Six hours in the stocks or a fine of five shillings was the usual penalty for being drunk and disorderly.

The company placed an advertisement in the Staffordshire Advertiser that was published on September 13, 1817, which read: “Notice is hereby given that henceforward a market will be held at Tunstall, in the Potteries, weekly on Saturdays in front of the Court-House. The first to be on Saturday, 20 September. Stalls and standings free.”

Tunstall Market was both a retail market and a wholesale market. Retailers sold fruit and vegetables, meat, fish, poultry and salt. Horse drawn waggons brought dairy produce, fruit and vegetables to the wholesale market which attracted retailers from Burslem, Hanley, Stoke, Longton and Fenton.

Heritage Market Celebrates 200 Years

tunstall marketHeritage tourism is big business. More than 4.7 million tourists visit Stoke-on-Trent each year.

Tunstall’s heritage market will be celebrating its 200th birthday on September 23rd, 2017.

Spotlight on Stoke believes that everyone who cares about Tunstall’s future should back the market’s bi-centennial celebrations and help to make them a success.

Tourists spend a lot of money when they visit a town.

The bi-centennial celebrations will put Tunstall on Stoke-on-Trent’s tourist trail and help to regenerate the town centre.

Tunstall Market 1817-2017

tunstall market

Spotlight on Tunstall – First Primitive Methodist Chapel

Stoke-on-Trent.

via The first Primitive Methodist chapel, Tunstall. — Postcards from Stoke

Get involved – Burslem School of Art Trust is looking for volunteers

Why not volunteer with us? Burslem School of Art is always looking for volunteers to help us with our exhibitions, open days and classes. Exhibition Volunteers: We rely on volunteers to help run th…

Source: Get involved – Burslem School of Art Trust

Scanning Tips from Drawing the Street

Rhomany’s Realm of Urban Sketchers Stoke-on-Trent recently asked me this great question: “Can you give us any tips on scanning/photographing your sketches for sharing online?” I thought it was worth taking some time to answer. With most mobile smart phones, it’s straightforward enough to take a great photo, crop and edit it and post on […]

via Sketchbook scan tips — Drawing the Street

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