Monthly Archives: May 2019

NEWS DESK: MPs want the government to save our banks

An influential committee of MPs has called on the government to save Britain’s high street banks. Members of the Treasury Committee have said that face to face banking must be preserved to prevent large sections of the community being cut off from vital financial services.

The committee wants banks to consider sharing premises and to operate mobile branches to meet the needs of customers throughout the country.

Many small towns and villages have already lost their banks, and the committee calls on the government to force banks to continue to provide face to face banking facilities service for their customers.

Britain’s banks seem determined to force all their customers to bank online. The demise of the high street bank has been dramatic. In 1988 there were 20,583 high street banks. By 2017 the number had fallen to 9,690.

Unless the government takes action and forces the banks to provide local services for local people, many more high street shops will close, and our town centres will become ghost towns.

Spotlight on The Potteries – Do You Remember Woolworths in Stoke?

6-8 Majestic Buildings, Campbell Place, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffs Woolworths opened in Stoke-on-Trent in 1928. Two other Stoke-on-Trent stores already existed at Hanley and Longton. This third one opened at 6-8 Majestic Buildings, which we know thanks to Graham Soult‘s research. You can see the small store on the far right of this photo. The building on the far left […]

To read more visit Stoke-on-Trent – Store 324 — Woolies Buildings – Then and Now

Spotlight on The Potteries: Wedgwood and Women by Sophie Guiny

In May 1759, 260 years ago this month, 29-year old Josiah Wedgwood founded his own pottery works. Born in a family of potters in Burslem, Staffordshire, young Josiah was struck by smallpox and the resulting damage to his leg (which would eventually be amputated) left him unable to operate a potter’s wheel. He turned his attention to design and experimentation with new clays and glazes, improving on known techniques and creating new styles and ceramics bodies, including the now iconic jasperware, which Wedgwood perfected around 1775. In both pursuits, women played a critical role as patrons, artists and factory workers.

To read more visit: Artists, Workers and Tastemakers: Wedgwood and Women – a guest post by Sophie Guiny – All Things Georgian

Spotlight on Stafford – Do You Remember Woolworths?

Woolies Buildings - Then and Now

18 Market Square, Stafford

Woolworths opened their 320th store  in Stafford on 23rd June 1928. It was at 18 Market Square, in a building full of character. You can see the store on the right here, next to the building works.

Stafford Woolworths 1934 Stafford Woolworths 1934

Source: Staffordshire Past Track

In 1962, it was intended for Woolworths to move to a bigger purpose-built store at Gaolgate Street and for the Market Square store to close. (Source: Soult’s Retail View)

The store number of 320 was transferred to the new store. But for some reason Woolworths decided to keep the old store open. With the store number given to the new branch, the Market Square store had to be assigned a new number, and that was store number 1067. You can see the original store open in this 1972 photo.

Stafford Woolworths (Market Square) 1972

Stafford Woolworths (Market Square) 1972

Source: Stoke on Trent Live

The Market…

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Spotlight on Newcastle-under-Lyme: Do You Remember Woolworths?

96 High Street (formerly Penkhull Street), Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffs ST5 1QF The 300th Woolworths store opened in 1928 on Penkhull Street in a timber-framed building. At some point Penkhull Street was renamed ‘High Street’. Source: BBC After WW2 the ‘3d and 6d’ was dropped from the fascia so it read ‘F. W. Woolworth’. Source: Age […]

via Newcastle-under-Lyme – Store 300 — Woolies Buildings – Then and Now