Category Archives: The Potteries

Tunstall Market – An Abandoned Stall

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TUNSTALL MARKET (1998)

Looking at several photographs taken inside Tunstall Covered Market when it was closed for regeneration in the 1990s, we came across this photograph of the Refreshment Stall at the rear of the Market Hall. Although the colours have faded with time, we are sure the photograph will bring back memories of both the refreshment stall and the oatcake stall seen in the background.

At the moment Spotlight is trying to digitally enhance the photograph which is one of several photographs of The Potteries given to David when he was in Tunstall recently.

HOMe-hOUSE 25 – The alleyway — Tim Diggles

HOMe-hOUSE 25 – The alleyway The alleyway behind my house is part of a mirror image of the streets similar to the millions of alleyways (or often called around here ‘the backs’) behind terraces up and down Britain and I am sure abroad as well. There is an alleyway joining Newfield and Bond Street so […]

To read more visit HOMe-hOUSE 25 – The alleyway — Tim Diggles

Diary Date – The Big Feast 2018

Prepare for another unforgettable August Bank Holiday weekend in The Potteries as the annual arts extravaganza The Big Feast returns to the streets of Stoke-on-Trent City Centre.

On Friday 24 and Saturday 25 August there will be an assortment of astonishing, unexpected and appetising FREE entertainment for you, your family and friends.

For more information visit The Big Feast Festival 2018 – What’s on – Appetite Stoke

Diary Dates – Heritage open days in The Potteries

Heritage Open Day: Hanley Park – Past, Present and FutureMeet at the fountain in the Cauldon grounds of Hanley Park. Booking essential.
Date: 6 September
Location: Hanley Park, College Road,, Stoke on Trent, ST4 2DG (Time: 18:00 – 19:00)Heritage Open Day: Ford Green Hall

Find out about Tudor and Stuart food and drink, peek at our re-opened dovecote and handle replica period objects and experience toys and games played 400 years ago.
Date: 9 September
Location: Ford Green Hall  Ford Green Road, Smallthorne, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST6 1NG (Time: 11:00 – 15:00)

Heritage Open Day: Gladstone Pottery Museum

Special Heritage Open Days event – normally chargeable.
Date: 8 September
Location: Gladstone Pottery Museum  Uttoxeter Road, Longton, Stoke-on-Trent, ST3 1PQ (Time: 10:00 – 17:00)

Heritage Open Day: Fenton Town Hall

Special Heritage Open Days event – not normally open to the public. Come and see the progress of the on-going restoration of the old town hall.
Dates: 6 September – 8 September
Interval: Every day
Location: Fenton Town Hall, 1 Albert Square, Fenton, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 3FA (Time: 09:00 – 16:00)

Heritage Open Days: Dudson Museum

View the museum in a bottle oven and the Dudson Ceramics Collection during this special Saturday opening of The Dudson Museum for Heritage Open Days.
Date: 8 September
Location: The Dudson Museum, The Dudson Centre, Hope Street, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent, ST1 5DD (Time: 10:00 – 15:00)

Heritage Open Days: Cineworld

Heritage Open Day special event – not normally available. Booking essential for this 25-minute documentary about Clarice Cliff.
Date: 6 September – 9 September
Interval: Every day
Location: Cineworld Cinema, Bryan Street, Hanley, ST1 5BN (Time: 09:45 – 11:00)

Heritage Open Day: CoRE at the Enson Works

Heritage Open Days event – not normally open to the public.
Date: 6 September
Location: CoRE, Normacot Road, Longton, Stoke-on-Trent, ST3 1PR (Time: 10:00 – 16:00)

Heritage Open Days: Ceramic City Stories

Heritage Open Days event – not normally open to the public.
Date: 8 September – 9 September
Interval: Every day
Location: CLAYHEAD, Winkhill Mill, Swan Street, Stoke-on-Trent ST4 7RH (Time: 09:00 – 12:00)

Heritage Open Day: Ceramic City Stories

Part of Heritage Open Days event – not normally open to the public
Date: 6 September – 7 September
Interval: Every day
Location: CLAYHEAD, Winkhill Mill, Swan Street, Stoke-on-Trent ST4 7RH (Time: 12:00 – 18:00)

Heritage Open Day: Biking to Bottle Ovens

Part of Heritage Open Days festival – bike ride around 20 bottle ovens.
Date: 9 September
Location: Central Forest Park  Chell Street, Sneyd Green, Stoke-on-Trent, ST1 6BB (Time: 09:30 – 12:30)

Celebrating the Hardworking History of English Ceramics

Pottery and ceramics are enjoying a revival in England. It’s early days, and it’s patchy, but there are some gloriously green shoots of renewal, investment, and public support. A visit to the Staffordshire Potteries opens up the history of this important industry and demonstrates why it thoroughly deserves a resurgence. And this year is the ideal time to visit, as they are marking 40 years since the last giant bottle oven was fired…

via Celebrating the Hardworking History of English Ceramics — The Vale Magazine

A BOOK ABOUT TUNSTALL MARKET

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TUNSTALL INDOOR MARKET CELEBRATES ITS 160th ANNIVERSARY THIS YEAR

Tunstall’s indoor market was opened in 1858. To celebrate the 160th anniversary of its o, historical geographer, Betty Cooper and international heritage lawyer, David Martin are writing a book about the market which is being published later this year.

HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION

Tunstall’s historic Market Hall is one of the few remaining Victorian covered markets in the country.

The covered market cost £7,651 13s 1d. It was designed by Wolverhampton based architect George Thomas Robinson, who created Burslem’s old town hall. The market hall was opened by the chief bailiff, Thomas Peake on the 2 December 1858. Trading commenced there on the 4 December 1858 and customers could buy meat and fish, poultry and game, fruit and vegetables, groceries and dairy produce, clothing and manufactured goods.

In the early 1880s, one-third of the covered market, including its main entrance in High Street, was demolished to make way for a new town hall.

Built in the free Renaissance style, the town hall was designed by North Staffordshire’s leading architect, Absalom Reade Wood.

While the town hall was being constructed, Wood regenerated the remaining part of the market hall giving it a new glazed roof. New stalls were erected. The floor was relaid and the building was redecorated. Tunstall’s chief bailiff, John Nash Peake, opened the new town hall on the 29 October 1885. To celebrate its opening, a luncheon was held in the town hall. Afterwards, the band of the 4th Royal Irish Dragoon Guards and the members of Burslem Prize Choir gave a Promenade Concert in the covered market. In the evening a football match took place in Phoenix Park and the day ended with a grand ball in the market hall.

BETTY AND DAVID NEED YOUR HELP

Many people who shop in the market today must remember the covered market before it closed for regeneration in the 1990s and the temporary market hall that was erected in Woodland Street.

If you were a child in the 1970s, 80s and 90s, your mother could have taken you to the market on Saturdays when she did the weekend shopping. You may even have had a part-time job working on one of the stalls when you were at school or college.

If you have memories or photographs of the market which you would like to share with Betty and David please contact them via Leave A Reply (below) or email them at daymar727@talktalk.net

Visitors give Tunstall Market top marks

Spotlight on The Potteries is always pleased when it discovers nice comments about our area.

Recently, while glancing at TripAdvisor, we found three reviews written by visitors to Tunstall Market.

All reviewers rated the market as excellent.

The first reviewer, who posted her review on 14 September 1917, visited the market to buy bacon and to purchase a sausage roll and an egg custard for her mother. She found that people in the market were friendly and said it had a “good wool stall” and “a great café”.

Her words about the café were echoed by the second reviewer who went to the market to get a bite to eat. Although the café was busy, the reviewer, who had a full English breakfast and a mug of tea, said the “huge meal” which was reasonably priced “tasted great”.

The third reviewer, whose review was posted on 17 February 2018, described the market as “a lovely, old-fashioned indoor market. This reviewer, who seems to know Tunstall Market well, said the original Victorian Market Hall still retained the “lovely old atmosphere that it had decades ago” adding that the stalls were excellent and sold “a wide variety of goods”.

Historical geographer, Betty Cooper, and international heritage lawyer, David Martin, are writing a book about Tunstall Market. If the third reviewer or anyone else who has known the market for many years would like to share their memories of it with Betty and David please email them at daymar727@talktalk.net  

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TUNSTALL INDOOR MARKET CELEBRATES ITS 160th ANNIVERSARY THIS YEAR

Potteries Morris Minor owners club – sketch.

Art by Christine Mallaband-Brown

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I went to a model train show last year and while my partner was looking at the model trains I decided to draw a Morris Minor that was parked outside. There were a few of them there and I had a chat with one of the owners. It turned out the people were from  the Potteries Morris Minor owners club. They love their cars and the Morris I drew was beautifully presented.

I decided to do the sketch before I realised I had not got anything to sketch with, I had a tiny sketch pad but no pencils… so I used what came to hand which was a black biro. The drawing was going well, but the biro ran out. Thats why part of it is blue. I could pretend it was reflected sky, but that is a lucky result if running out of ink!

Morris Minor cars are iconic…

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Tunstall – An Anglo Saxon Village

Anglo-Saxon Village

An Artist’s Impression of an Anglo-Saxon Settlement

Tunstall is one of the oldest towns in The Potteries.

The town’s “Old English” name indicates that it dates from the late 6th or the early 7th century.

“Old English” place names are descriptive. They describe the settlement and tell us the main occupation of the people who lived there. The word “Tun” means an enclosed farmstead, hamlet or village, and “Stall” is derived from the “Old English” word “Steall” which means a place with pens or sheds where cattle were kept for fattening.

Anglo-Saxon Tunstall was built on a sandstone ridge overlooking the Chatterley Valley near the spot where Green Lane (Oldcourt Street and America Street) crossed the old drove road (Roundwell Street) from the Staffordshire Moorlands to Chester. Green Lane which ran from Leicester to Warrington was an important highway that linked the East Midlands with Merseyside. All traces of Anglo-Saxon Tunstall have disappeared although historians believe it was an enclosed settlement protected by a ditch and a wooden palisade.

Two old field names, Gods Croft and Church Field, which survived until the 19th century, support the local tradition that there was a church in Tunstall many centuries before the Wesleyan Methodists erected a church in America Street. Another old field named Cross Croft near where Madison Street joins America Street indicates that there could have been a wayside cross where markets were held. Calver Street, which runs between Forster Street and Oldcourt Street, takes its name from Calver Croft a place where there were cattle pens for calves born on the journey from the Staffordshire Moorlands to Chester.

Towards the end of the 11th or the beginning of the 12th century, Tunstall became part of Staffordshire’s New Forest.

Today when we think of a forest, we picture a place covered by trees. In medieval times a forest was a large tract of land where the King and his friends hunted for deer and other beasts of the field.

Staffordshire’s New Forest, which extended from Tixall in the south to Mow Cop in the north, may have been founded by William the Conqueror. The forest was not an area of continuous woodland. It was the King’s hunting ground which included:

  • woods and grassland
  • hills and moorland
  • towns, villages and hamlets
  • farmland, open fields and rough pasture.

The forest had its own laws designed to protect the beasts of the field and the vegetation they ate. Offenders against Forest Laws were brought before special courts. The penalties imposed by these courts were brutal and savage. For killing a beast of the field, a poacher could be sent to the gallows, have his eyes torn out or have his hand cut off.

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