Category Archives: Tunstall

Bygone Tunstall – The Victoria Institute

In 1905, Tunstall Urban District Council produced a Year Book which gave details of the major buildings and places of interest in Tunstall including the Victoria Institute.

The edited account of the history of the Victoria Institute posted below is taken is taken from the Year Book.

THE VICTORIA INSTITUTE

“This building, the foundation stones of which were laid on the 16th May 1889, was erected by public subscription in commemoration of Her Majesty’s Jubilee and comprises a School of Science, Art and Technology and a Public Library…

“On the 24th October 1895, the foundation stone of an extension to the Institute was laid.

“The extension, which included a Museum, a Cookery School and Pottery Decorating Studios, was being erected by the Urban District Council with the help of a grant of £700 from Staffordshire County Council.”


Tunstall’s Technical Schools

jubilee-building-tunstall

THE VICTORIA INSTITUTE

Tunstall’s Technical Schools, which were housed in the Victoria Institute in Station Road (The Boulevard), opened in November 1890.

Subjects taught by the schools included Art, Science and General Subjects.

Most students attending classes at the schools worked during the day in industry or commerce and gave up their evenings to study for vocational qualifications.

The schools’ academic year started in September, and there were four ten-week terms, Students were given a week’s holiday at Christmas, another week at either Easter or Whitsun and a “long vacation” lasting two months during July and August. To ensure that students attended classes regularly during term time a register of attendance was kept which could be viewed by their parents or guardians and by their employers.

Tunstall’s Technical Schools entered their students for examinations set by the Board of Education. Students who passed were awarded certificates and the ones who gained the highest marks were given gold, silver or bronze medals.

Students who wanted to continue with their studies and become industrial designers or art teachers could apply for scholarships tenable at the Royal College of Art in London.

Speaking at Tunstall Technical Schools’ annual prizegiving ceremony in 1899, Staffordshire County Council’s director of technical education, Thomas Turner, said that North Staffordshire, like other leading industrial areas, should have its own University College.

The local newspaper, The Sentinel, supported Turner’s call for a University College to be established in North Staffordshire and asked one of the area’s leading educationalists to write about the scheme.

Published on May 27, 1899, the article that was written by an unnamed contributor said technical schools in The Potteries were too small to run scientific or academic courses for boys and girls who had been educated to matriculation standard.

To overcome this problem, the writer suggested creating a North Staffordshire College where students could read for degrees in academic subjects and receive degree level vocational training in engineering, ceramic technology, mining or metallurgy.

Photograph © Copyright Steve Lewin and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Spotlight on Tunstall – The Sir Smith Child Clock Tower

This extract from the Tunstall Year Book, which was published in 1905, gives an account of the Sir Smith Child Clock Tower in Tower Square which was built by public subscription and presented to the town in 1893.

THE SIR SMITH CHILD CLOCK TOWER

“On Thursday, the 23rd November 1893, the ceremony of unveiling and handing over to the town this Tower, which was erected during the lifetime of Sir Smith Child, as a permanent memorial to commemorate his unparalleled acts of benevolence to Tunstall, was performed by Mr Alfred Meakin, in the presence of Mr J G Child, and a numerous company.

“The Tower, which is erected at the west end of the Market Square (Tower Square), and is constructed of buff terra-cotta, stands some 50 feet high, is fitted with a striking clock with Cambridge chimes, having four dials, and at the base of the structure is a bronze bust of Sir Smith Child in a niche designed for that purpose.

“The cost of the Tower has been over £1,500, which amount was contributed by over 3,500 subscribers.”

 

 

Spotlight on Tunstall – Market Returns to Tower Square

Spotlight on North Staffordshire and the Potteries is delighted to learn that market traders have returned to Tower Square and that once again Tunstall has an outdoor market.

We hope that local people will support the new market which will help to regenerate Tower Square and halt the decline of High Street.

Spotlight sends its best wishes to the traders in Tower Square and hope that the outdoor market is a great success.

Reduced Fares Encouraged Families To Shop In Tunstall

At the beginning of the 20th century, there was a retail and a wholesale market in Tunstall.

Held in the Market Place (Tower Square), the wholesale market was open every day except Sunday. From Lady Day (March 25th) to Michaelmas (September 29th) it opened at 6.00am. Between Michaelmas and Lady Day the market opened two hours later at 8.00am.

The retail market in the Market Hall was open on Mondays and Saturdays. On Mondays, the market opened from 8.00am to 8.00pm. Saturday was a working day for many people, and on Saturdays, the retail market was open from 8.00am to 10.00pm.

To encourage families living in North Staffordshire and South Cheshire to shop in Tunstall Market, the North Staffordshire Railway Company issued Cheap Market Returns to Tunstall and Chatterley Train Stations from Kidsgrove, Halmerend, Audley, Talke, Alsager Road, Congleton, Mow Cop, Crewe, Radway Green, Alsager, Sandbach, Lawton, Keele and Leycett.

Scarratt’s Tunstall – A town with 50 Houses

In his book “Old Times In The Potteries” published in 1906, William Scarratt tells us there were 50 houses in Tunstall in 1740.

These houses, which Scarratt called cottages, were built of brick. Most had tiled roofs although a few were thatched. A house called The Cottage at Clay Hills was thatched as were cottages in America Street, a building at the Round Well (where Ladywell Road joins Roundwell Street) and six properties in Watergate Street.

Whether thatched or tiled, these two storey houses had four rooms. Known as “two up and two down”, they had two rooms downstairs and two rooms upstairs. On the ground floor was a large front room behind which was a small back room. Upstairs there were two bedrooms.

There were some houses with tiled roofs at The Flash, near where High Street becomes Brownhills Road, and six more on the site of the former community centre built in the 1990s, which is now occupied by Tunstall Children’s Centre.

A group of buildings stood on the site where the town hall and the market hall were erected during the second half of the 19th century. There were houses in Mill Street (The Boulevard) and near the Swan Inn in High Street.

Publication of book about Tunstall Town Hall and Market postponed

Spotlight on North Staffordshire and The Potteries has had to postpone publication of its book The History of Tunstall Town Hall and Market.

David Martin who is editing the book and writing its closing chapters was taken ill shortly before Christmas.

He lost the use of his legs and was unable to walk for several weeks.

Although his legs are still very painful, David has just started to walk again.

He anticipates being away from work until the end of May.

When David returns to work, his first job will be to complete the book and arrange for its publication.

NewsDesk – Burslem has become a ghost town

According to research by the Local Data Company, a third of the shops in Burslem’s run-down town centre are unoccupied.

Shops and banks have moved out. Nothing has come in to replace them.

Some shops have been empty for over five years, and one resident claims that there isn’t even a greengrocer’s shop where a customer can buy an apple. Very few people shop in Burslem. The town has nothing to offer them.

Many buildings in Market Place and Queen Street are abandoned and derelict. Their windows are broken. Willowherb and buddleias grow out of the guttering and weeds of all kinds have made their home in cracks in the brickwork.

June Cartwright the founder of Our Burslem, a group campaigning to regenerate Burslem, is trying to persuade Stoke-on-Trent City Council to open a street market which she believes will ease the town’s reliance on traditional high street shops.

Burslem is not the only town in The Potteries which has been abandoned by both shopkeepers and customers. Although Longton seems relatively busy, very few people shop in Fenton and Stoke which, like Burslem, have become ghost towns.

Focus on Tunstall: Do you have memories of Tunstall town hall and market?

tunstall-town-hall

Do you have memories of Tunstall town hall and market?

Did you work in the market or did you go shopping there with your mother when you were growing up? Can you remember the stalls that were in the market hall and the things they sold before it was regenerated at the end of the 20th century?

Spotlight on North Staffordshire and The Potteries is writing a booklet about the history of the town hall and the market.

If you have memories or old photographs of the market or the town hall which you would be willing to share with us, please email David Martin at daymar727@talktalk.net

Many happy returns to Tunstall’s indoor market – it’s 160 years old today

tunstall-market

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO TUNSTALL’S INDOOR MARKET FROM THE SPOTLIGHT TEAM

Opened on December 2nd, 1858, Tunstall’s indoor market celebrates its 160th birthday today.

One of the best markets in England and Wales, the indoor market, which is tucked away behind the town hall in High Street, is Stoke-on-Trent’s hidden gem.

Tunstall market is a warm-hearted place where friendly, welcoming traders sell high-quality fish and meat, fruit and vegetables, groceries, household goods and luxury items at reasonable prices to local people and customers who have come from as far afield as Alsager, Biddulph, Mow Cop and Congleton to do their weekend shopping.

Despite wars and recessions, the market has served the community for 160 years. The Spotlight team is certain that the market will continue to serve the people of Tunstall and the surrounding area for another 160 years.

« Older Entries