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DiaryDate: Video Time in Memory Lane

Screenshot (7)Memory Lane in Tunstall Market opens at 9.30am on Saturday, April 14th. It’s a place where you can remember the good old days and reminisce about years gone by.  You will be able to play traditional pub games including table skittles, shove ha’penny and hoopla.

Between 10.00am and 11.00am on the 14th, Memory Lane will be showing a video The History of Tunstall.

Stay in Memory Lane after you have seen the video and view the exhibits and photographs on display. Before you leave the building explore Tunstall’s heritage market where you will find friendly traders who are selling a wide range of quality goods and services at reasonable prices,

Newcastle and The Potteries in 1750

 

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A SMALL POT BANK WITH A CONE SHAPED KILN

In July 1750, the Rev. Richard Pococke visited Newcastle-under-Lyme and The Potteries.

Richard who kept a journal of his travels described North Staffordshire as an area where pottery manufacturers used local clay to make unglazed earthenware, bricks, tiles water pipes and plant pots. Some manufacturers mixed white pipeclay from Poole in Dorset with calcinated flintstone from Lincolnshire and other places to make salt-glazed stoneware pottery and ornaments.

All the ware made in the district was baked “in kilns built in the shape of a cone” which Richard said gave the area “a pretty appearance”. He went on to say that there were “great numbers” of these kilns in the Pottery villages to the east of Newcastle-under-Lyme.

In this edited extract from his journal, Richard describes Newcastle-under-Lyme and The Potteries as they were in 1750.

Newcastle and The Potteries in 1750

Newcastle is a small, well-built market town situated on the slope of a hill overlooking a lake. It has a handsome church and a market hall. Although Newcastle is the capital of the neighbouring Pottery villages, there are only a few potters working in the town.

I left Newcastle on July 6th went to see the Pottery villages. I rode two miles to Stoke where stoneware is made. On leaving Stoke, I visited Shelton where red chinaware is produced and then went to Hanley were all kinds of pottery are manufactured. I visited Burslem where the best white and other types of pottery are made. The last place I went to was Tunstall. Although all kinds of pottery are made there, Tunstall is famous for making the best bricks and tiles.

Video about Trentham Gardens at Memory Lane in Tunstall Market

Screenshot (4)Memory Lane in Tunstall Market is showing a video about the history of Trentham Gardens. The video, which includes scenes of the ballroom and the open air swimming pool, will be shown between 2.00pm and 3.00pm on Saturday, April 14th.

Admission Free. Come and watch the video. Talk about your memories of Trentham Gardens and stay to explore Tunstall’s heritage market hall where you will find friendly traders who sell a wide range of high-quality products at reasonable prices.

Tunstall Schools – Can You help Spotlight?


victorian schoolroomSpotlight on Stoke is researching the history of education in Tunstall.

We are hoping to write short posts about all the schools in the town including:

  • St. Mary’s
  • The Catholic School in Oldcourt Street
  • Summerbank Road Schools
  • Tunstall High School for Girls
  • Brownhills High School
  • High Street Schools
  • Forster Street Schools

Except for Forster Street, all the schools built in Tunstall during the 19th century have been demolished. Very few photographs of them survive. If you attended any of these schools and would like to share memories of your school days with us, please email spotlightstoke@talktalk.net

Take a trip down Memory Lane

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Visit “Memory Lane” in Tunstall Market to recall your childhood and share your memories of life in Tunstall with people who don’t know what the town was like in the 1940s, 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s.

Introduce them to the games you played with your friends. Reminisce about your school days and talk about your first job.

Over the years, the face of Tunstall has changed. The slums in “Old Town” have been swept away. Pot banks and tile works have been demolished and replaced by houses and shopping centres.

Although the Market Hall was regenerated at the beginning of the 21st century, many heritage buildings including the Town Hall, Tunstall Pool, the Jubilee Buildings and Bank Chambers face an uncertain future.

High Street Schools, Jubilee Methodist Church, St. Mary’s Church, King Street Methodist Church, St. Mary’s Secondary School and Wesley Place Methodist Church were demolished many years ago.

Come to “Memory Lane” and tell other visitors about these buildings and show them your photographs of Tunstall as it was in bygone years.

Memory Lane opens in Tunstall Market on Saturday, April 14th and it will be open from 9.30am to 4.30pm on market days which are Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. For more details telephone Diane on 07980459889.

Tunstall has one of the best markets in England and Wales

13510852_1767361226841230_8194106140212701983_nTunstall has one of the best markets in England and Wales.

Tucked away behind the town hall in High Street, the market is Stoke-on-Trent’s hidden gem.

A warm-hearted place where friendly, welcoming traders sell high-quality fish and meat, fruit and vegetables, groceries, household goods and luxury items at reasonable prices to local people and customers who have come from as far away as Alsager, Biddulph, Mow Cop and Congleton to do their weekend shopping.

Founded in 1817, the market which celebrated its bicentennial in 2017 moved into the market hall behind the town hall in 1858.

The market hall was designed by George Thomas Robinson, the architect who created Burslem’s old town hall.

Scarratt’s Tunstall – King Street Schools

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A VICTORIAN SCHOOLROOM

William Scarratt’s book “Old Times in the Potteries” is a collection of facts and reminiscences of life in “the six towns” from the end of the 18th century to the beginning of the 20th.

Published in 1906, the book is based on a series of articles William wrote for the Weekly Sentinel.

Born at Tunstall in the early 1840s, he was educated at a Dame School, King Street National Schools and Newchapel Grammar School.

In his book, William says there were several dame schools and three elementary schools in Tunstall when he was growing up. One of the elementary schools was the Church of England National School in King Street (Madison Street). The school, which was built with money raised by Christ Church, was housed in a “clean, lofty, airy, well-ventilated building”.

The other two elementary schools were British Schools founded by the Methodist Church.

The National School in King Street, which William attended, was opened in 1839. In 1841, it had 333 pupils (125 boys and 208 girls). In those days, parents had to pay school pence for their children’s education. The parents of children attending King Street were charged 2d a week for each child’s schooling.

By the time William went there, a good-natured rebellion known as barring-out had become a school tradition. On barring-out day, the boys came to school early. They locked the headmaster and the teachers out of the building and refused to let them in until the headmaster agreed to give all the pupils a holiday.

When recalling his school days, William wrote about the barring-out day ceremony he saw during his first year at King Street.

In this edited extract from “Old Times in the Potteries” he says:

“I was one of the little ones and of no consequence in the eyes of the older boys and was an observer of the first barring-out day I experienced. The headmaster came to school at the usual hour, but he could not get in. Great was the excitement inside the schoolroom. The big boys went to the open windows. Some of them put the keys on a long pole which was held out so high that the headmaster could not reach them. The headmaster and the teachers had been barred-out.

“Parleying of a bantering nature began between the boys and the headmaster which continued until he agreed to give the whole school a holiday.

“Great was the triumph of the victors who said they would have kept the doors locked all afternoon if he had refused to give them their annual holiday.”

Can You Help Spotlight?

Like most of the schools built in Tunstall during the Victorian era, King Street has been demolished.

Spotlight on Stoke is researching the history of education for its new series Focus on Tunstall. If you went to school in Tunstall and would like to share your memories of your school days with us email spotlightstoke@talktalk.net

Tunstall Market’s Early History

13510852_1767361226841230_8194106140212701983_nTunstall’s heritage market celebrated its bicentenary on September 20, 2017.

In 1816, Tunstall’s chief constable, pottery manufacturer John Henry Clive, founded a company to build a Magistrates’ Courthouse and create a Market Place.

The company leased three-quarters of an acre of sloping ground called Stoney Croft from Walter Sneyd, the Lord of the Manor. It built a courthouse and laid out a market place, which later became Tower Square, on the site.

A two-storey stone building, the courthouse had a fire station with two fire engines and a market hall on the ground floor where eggs, butter, milk and cheese were sold when the market opened. The building faced eastwards. It was erected about half way up the slope. Steps led from the lower part of the Market Place, where stalls were set up on market day, to the market hall’s main entrance.

Beneath the market hall was the town lock up – a dark, foul-smelling dungeon where prisoners were held while awaiting trial. The stocks stood at the foot of the steps leading to the market hall. Six hours in the stocks or a fine of five shillings was the usual penalty for being drunk and disorderly.

The company placed an advertisement in the Staffordshire Advertiser on September 13, 1817, which read: “Notice is hereby given that henceforward a market will be held at Tunstall, in the Potteries, weekly on Saturdays in front of the Court-House. The first to be on Saturday, 20 September. Stalls and standings free.”

Tunstall Market was both a retail market and a wholesale market. Retailers sold fruit and vegetables, meat, fish, poultry and salt. Horse-drawn waggons brought dairy produce, fruit and vegetables to the wholesale market which attracted retailers from Burslem, Hanley, Stoke, Longton and Fenton.

An Act of Parliament passed in 1840 created the Tunstall Market Company to manage the market. In 1847, the company sold the market for £6,500 to the town’s Improvement Commissioners. Shortly afterwards, the commissioners allowed dealers to sell hay and straw there. In 1855, the Improvement Commissioners were replaced by a Board of Health. The Board of Health managed the market until 1894 when Boards of Health were abolished, and Urban District Councils were created to replace them. Tunstall Urban District Council ran the market until 1910 when the “six towns amalgamated” to form the County Borough of Stoke-on-Trent.

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Did you go to school in Tunstall?

tunstall-town-hallSpotlight on Stoke is researching the history of education in Tunstall for its new series Focus on Tunstall, and we shall be writing posts about all the schools in the town including:

  • St. Mary’s Schools
  • The Catholic School in Oldcourt Street
  • Summerbank Road Schools
  • Tunstall High School for Girls
  • Brownhills High School
  • High Street Schools
  • Forster Street Schools

Most of the schools that were built in Tunstall during the 19th century have been demolished.

If you were educated in Tunstall and have any photographs of the school you attended or would like to share memories of your school days with Spotlight email spotlightstoke@talktalk.net

Focus on Tunstall – William Scarratt

tunstall-town-hallIn his book “Old Times in the Potteries” which was published in 1906, William Scarratt recalls growing up in Tunstall and describes life in the town during the Victorian era.

The book is based on a series of features which he wrote for the Weekly Sentinel.

In an article introducing these features to Weekly Sentinel readers, R. W. Ship said that Scarratt would “have little need to introduce himself”. For over 50 years he had moved freely about four of the six Pottery towns and was well known in Tunstall. If anyone asked him to justify writing about The Potteries, Scarratt could say that during his childhood he was fascinated by “the stories” his parents told about events which had taken place in the latter part of the eighteenth century and that his interest in local history had “grown with the passing years”.

During 2018, Spotlight on Stoke will from time to time be posting edited extracts from “Old Times in the Potteries” in its new series Focus on Tunstall.

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