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Focus on Tunstall – Diary Date: Tunstall Market Remembers

tunstall-town-hallOn Saturday, November 11th, Tunstall’s Indoor Heritage Market will remember those who died for freedom.

Between 11am and 2pm, Melanie, a well known local singer, will be singing your favourite songs from the 1940s.

Members of the Royal British Legion will be selling poppies in the market hall.

Staffs Imperial Stormtroopers are coming to Tunstall Market

Screenshot (6)Come along and say Hello to Staffs Imperial Stormtroopers when they visit Tunstall’s indoor heritage market on Saturday, November 18th, 2017 for a Star Wars themed fun day.

The fun begins when the Stormtroopers arrive at 11am.

Come and join in.

Wear a Star Wars costume and have your photograph taken with the Stormtroopers. Explore the market and meet its welcoming, friendly traders who sell high-quality fruit and vegetables, groceries, fish and meat, household goods, luxury items, watches and toys at reasonable prices.

Focus on Goldenhill: St. John’s Church

St John's Goldenhill 163488_db9ff3b2At the beginning of 1840, the Rev. Charles Wade, the curate in charge of St. Thomas’s Church in Kidsgrove, launched a public appeal to build a church at Goldenhill, a mining village on the North Staffordshire Coalfield.

Wade asked North Staffordshire’s leading philanthropist, Smith Child, to help him raise money to build the church.

Smith Child agreed to support the project and became chair of the appeal committee. He donated £200 to the building fund and gave £1,000 to endow the living.

Miss Sparrow and her sister, Mrs Moreton, gave the committee a site where Elgood Lane joins High Street to erect a church, build a school and lay out a cemetery. After four months, the committee had raised enough money to start building the church whose foundation stone was laid by Smith Child’s wife, Sarah, on August 3rd, 1840.

Dedicated to St. John the Evangelist, the church was a plain Norman-style brick building. Designed by Shelton architect Thomas Stanley, the church cost £2,000. St. Johns had a square tower that was surmounted by a stone spire. The church, which could accommodate more than 550 worshippers, was consecrated on August 11th, 1841 by James Bowstead, the Bishop of Lichfield.

The church closed in 2014. If you worshipped at St. John’s and have memories of the church which you would like to share with other Spotlight readers, please email us at spotlightstoke@talktalk.net   

Photograph of St. John’s © Copyright Steve Lewin and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

 

DiaryDate: Harvest Weekend in Tunstall

Tunstall Salvation Army is holding a Harvest Weekend at its church in Dunning Street.

There will be a fish and chip supper and a “Mindblowing Quiz at 6.30pm on Saturday, October 14th. (Admission £7 – concessions £5)

The meeting at 10.30am on Sunday, October 15th will be led by Major Samuel Edgar.

Telephone 01782 817578 for more details.

DiaryDate: Half Term Spooktacular and Treat or Trick Trail in Tunstall Market

Tunstall Indoor Market is holding a Half Term Spooktacular. The three-day event takes place between 11.30am and 2.30pm on:

  1. Wednesday 25th October when there will be Free Face Painting and a Trick or Treat Trail.
  2. Friday 27th October when there will be Spooky Crafts and a Trick or Treat Trail.
  3. Saturday 28th October when there will be Free Haloween Balloon Modelling, a Trick or Treat Trail and if you are “very brave” you can try to find all the Spooky Characters who are hiding in the market.

DiaryDate: Douglas Macmillan Coffee Morning in Tunstall Market

Screenshot (1) - Copy

Tunstall Market – an invitation to the party

tunstall marketCome and join the party. Tunstall’s heritage market is celebrating its 200th birthday tomorrow. Bring the family. Do your weekend shopping in Stoke-on-Trent’s best market while spending an enjoyable day taking part in the festivities.

In 1816, Tunstall’s chief constable, pottery manufacturer John Henry Clive, founded a company to build a Magistrates’ Courthouse and create a Market Place.

The company leased three-quarters of an acre of sloping ground called Stoney Croft from Walter Sneyd, the Lord of the Manor. It built a courthouse and laid out a market place, which later became Tower Square, on the site.

A two-storey stone building, the courthouse had a fire station with two fire engines and a market hall on the ground floor where eggs, butter, milk and cheese were sold when the market opened. The building faced eastwards. It was erected about halfway up the slope. Steps led from the lower part of the Market Place, where stalls were set up on market day, to the market hall’s main entrance.

Beneath the market hall was the town lock up – a dark, foul-smelling dungeon where prisoners were held while awaiting trial. The stocks stood at the foot of the steps leading to the market hall. Six hours in the stocks or a fine of five shillings was the usual penalty for being drunk and disorderly.

The company placed an advertisement in the Staffordshire Advertiser that was published on September 13, 1817, which read: “Notice is hereby given that henceforward a market will be held at Tunstall, in the Potteries, weekly on Saturdays in front of the Court-House. The first to be on Saturday, 20 September. Stalls and standings free.”

Tunstall Market was both a retail market and a wholesale market. Retailers sold fruit and vegetables, meat, fish, poultry and salt. Horse-drawn waggons brought dairy produce, fruit and vegetables to the wholesale market which attracted retailers from Burslem, Hanley, Stoke, Longton and Fenton.

DiaryDate: Join the Party – Tunstall Market celebrates its bicentenary on Saturday

tunstall marketTunstall’s heritage market is 200 years old.

In 1816, Tunstall’s chief constable, pottery manufacturer John Henry Clive, founded a company to build a Magistrates’ Courthouse and create a Market Place.

The company leased three-quarters of an acre of sloping ground called Stoney Croft from Walter Sneyd, the Lord of the Manor. It built a courthouse and laid out a market place, which later became Tower Square, on the site.

A two-storey stone building, the courthouse had a fire station with two fire engines and a market hall on the ground floor where eggs, butter, milk and cheese were sold when the market opened. The building faced eastwards. It was erected about half way up the slope. Steps led from the lower part of the Market Place, where stalls were set up on market day, to the market hall’s main entrance.

Beneath the market hall was the town lock up – a dark, foul smelling dungeon where prisoners were held while awaiting trial. The stocks stood at the foot of the steps leading to the market hall. Six hours in the stocks or a fine of five shillings was the usual penalty for being drunk and disorderly.

The company placed an advertisement in the Staffordshire Advertiser that was published on September 13, 1817, which read: “Notice is hereby given that henceforward a market will be held at Tunstall, in the Potteries, weekly on Saturdays in front of the Court-House. The first to be on Saturday, 20 September. Stalls and standings free.”

Tunstall Market was both a retail market and a wholesale market. Retailers sold fruit and vegetables, meat, fish, poultry and salt. Horse drawn waggons brought dairy produce, fruit and vegetables to the wholesale market which attracted retailers from Burslem, Hanley, Stoke, Longton and Fenton.

Heritage Market Celebrates 200 Years

tunstall marketHeritage tourism is big business. More than 4.7 million tourists visit Stoke-on-Trent each year.

Tunstall’s heritage market will be celebrating its 200th birthday on September 23rd, 2017.

Spotlight on Stoke believes that everyone who cares about Tunstall’s future should back the market’s bi-centennial celebrations and help to make them a success.

Tourists spend a lot of money when they visit a town.

The bi-centennial celebrations will put Tunstall on Stoke-on-Trent’s tourist trail and help to regenerate the town centre.

Tunstall Market 1817-2017

tunstall market

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