Spotlight on Stoke

Spotlight on Stoke-on-Trent

Stoke-on-Trent is proud of its heritage

A Mark IX Spitfire

People from Stoke-on-Trent are proud of their city’s heritage.

History records the achievements of men and women from our city and tells us the role they played on the world stage.

Stoke-on-Trent’s city council was one of the pioneers of comprehensive education. It defied both Conservative and Labour governments and replaced grammar and secondary modern schools with neighbourhood comprehensive schools and a sixth form college.

Local art schools, technical schools and colleges of further education were progressive centres of excellence. Reginald Mitchell, who designed the Spitfire, turned down a place at Birmingham University. He wanted to serve an apprenticeship with a firm in Fenton and to study engineering at technical schools in the city.

By the beginning of the 1930s, the North Staffordshire Technical College was a university in everything but name. The college had an international reputation and attracted overseas students. It possessed the world’s leading ceramic research centre and had Europe’s best mining school.

There are those who say the past is dead. They are wrong. The past lives in our collective memory. It makes us what we are today. Stoke-on-Trent has a proud heritage – a heritage which must not be forgotten. A city that forgets its past is a city without a future.

(Photograph of the Spitfire taken by Chowells, Edited by Fir0002)

DiaryDate: Harvest Weekend in Tunstall

Tunstall Salvation Army is holding a Harvest Weekend at its church in Dunning Street.

There will be a fish and chip supper and a “Mindblowing Quiz at 6.30pm on Saturday, October 14th. (Admission £7 – concessions £5)

The meeting at 10.30am on Sunday, October 15th will be led by Major Samuel Edgar.

Telephone 01782 817578 for more details.

DiaryDate: Half Term Spooktacular and Treat or Trick Trail in Tunstall Market

Tunstall Indoor Market is holding a Half Term Spooktacular. The three-day event takes place between 11.30am and 2.30pm on:

  1. Wednesday 25th October when there will be Free Face Painting and a Trick or Treat Trail.
  2. Friday 27th October when there will be Spooky Crafts and a Trick or Treat Trail.
  3. Saturday 28th October when there will be Free Haloween Balloon Modelling, a Trick or Treat Trail and if you are “very brave” you can try to find all the Spooky Characters who are hiding in the market.

Postcard from England #1, The Gladstone Pottery Museum | Tales Of Mindful Travels

Our much planned tour of our own country begins with a day spent in The Potteries at the Gladstone Pottery Museum, Longton, Stoke on Trent. Postcard today, review tomorrow.

Source: Postcard from England #1, The Gladstone Pottery Museum | Tales Of Mindful Travels

DiaryDate: Douglas Macmillan Coffee Morning in Tunstall Market

Screenshot (1) - Copy

Tunstall Market – an invitation to the party

tunstall marketCome and join the party. Tunstall’s heritage market is celebrating its 200th birthday tomorrow. Bring the family. Do your weekend shopping in Stoke-on-Trent’s best market while spending an enjoyable day taking part in the festivities.

In 1816, Tunstall’s chief constable, pottery manufacturer John Henry Clive, founded a company to build a Magistrates’ Courthouse and create a Market Place.

The company leased three-quarters of an acre of sloping ground called Stoney Croft from Walter Sneyd, the Lord of the Manor. It built a courthouse and laid out a market place, which later became Tower Square, on the site.

A two-storey stone building, the courthouse had a fire station with two fire engines and a market hall on the ground floor where eggs, butter, milk and cheese were sold when the market opened. The building faced eastwards. It was erected about halfway up the slope. Steps led from the lower part of the Market Place, where stalls were set up on market day, to the market hall’s main entrance.

Beneath the market hall was the town lock up – a dark, foul-smelling dungeon where prisoners were held while awaiting trial. The stocks stood at the foot of the steps leading to the market hall. Six hours in the stocks or a fine of five shillings was the usual penalty for being drunk and disorderly.

The company placed an advertisement in the Staffordshire Advertiser that was published on September 13, 1817, which read: “Notice is hereby given that henceforward a market will be held at Tunstall, in the Potteries, weekly on Saturdays in front of the Court-House. The first to be on Saturday, 20 September. Stalls and standings free.”

Tunstall Market was both a retail market and a wholesale market. Retailers sold fruit and vegetables, meat, fish, poultry and salt. Horse-drawn waggons brought dairy produce, fruit and vegetables to the wholesale market which attracted retailers from Burslem, Hanley, Stoke, Longton and Fenton.

DiaryDate: Join the Party – Tunstall Market celebrates its bicentenary on Saturday

tunstall marketTunstall’s heritage market is 200 years old.

In 1816, Tunstall’s chief constable, pottery manufacturer John Henry Clive, founded a company to build a Magistrates’ Courthouse and create a Market Place.

The company leased three-quarters of an acre of sloping ground called Stoney Croft from Walter Sneyd, the Lord of the Manor. It built a courthouse and laid out a market place, which later became Tower Square, on the site.

A two-storey stone building, the courthouse had a fire station with two fire engines and a market hall on the ground floor where eggs, butter, milk and cheese were sold when the market opened. The building faced eastwards. It was erected about half way up the slope. Steps led from the lower part of the Market Place, where stalls were set up on market day, to the market hall’s main entrance.

Beneath the market hall was the town lock up – a dark, foul smelling dungeon where prisoners were held while awaiting trial. The stocks stood at the foot of the steps leading to the market hall. Six hours in the stocks or a fine of five shillings was the usual penalty for being drunk and disorderly.

The company placed an advertisement in the Staffordshire Advertiser that was published on September 13, 1817, which read: “Notice is hereby given that henceforward a market will be held at Tunstall, in the Potteries, weekly on Saturdays in front of the Court-House. The first to be on Saturday, 20 September. Stalls and standings free.”

Tunstall Market was both a retail market and a wholesale market. Retailers sold fruit and vegetables, meat, fish, poultry and salt. Horse drawn waggons brought dairy produce, fruit and vegetables to the wholesale market which attracted retailers from Burslem, Hanley, Stoke, Longton and Fenton.

Heritage Market Celebrates 200 Years

tunstall marketHeritage tourism is big business. More than 4.7 million tourists visit Stoke-on-Trent each year.

Tunstall’s heritage market will be celebrating its 200th birthday on September 23rd, 2017.

Spotlight on Stoke believes that everyone who cares about Tunstall’s future should back the market’s bi-centennial celebrations and help to make them a success.

Tourists spend a lot of money when they visit a town.

The bi-centennial celebrations will put Tunstall on Stoke-on-Trent’s tourist trail and help to regenerate the town centre.

Tunstall Market 1817-2017

tunstall market

Spotlight on Tunstall – First Primitive Methodist Chapel

Stoke-on-Trent.

via The first Primitive Methodist chapel, Tunstall. — Postcards from Stoke

Get involved – Burslem School of Art Trust is looking for volunteers

Why not volunteer with us? Burslem School of Art is always looking for volunteers to help us with our exhibitions, open days and classes. Exhibition Volunteers: We rely on volunteers to help run th…

Source: Get involved – Burslem School of Art Trust

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